Aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener that is 180 to 200 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar). The Coca-Cola Company uses aspartame to sweeten many of the 8001 low- and no-calorie beverages we offer around the world. We do so with an uncompromising commitment to product safety and quality.

Aspartame is one of the most thoroughly researched food ingredients in use today, with more than 2001 studies to support its safety. It is permitted for use in more than 100 countries. Aspartame is used in over 6,0001 food and beverage products around the world, and has been used for more than 30 years.

Aspartame is 180 to 2001 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar) with no unpleasant aftertaste.

When used consistently to help control calorie intake, as part of an overall sensible, balanced diet, combined with regular physical activity, aspartame can be beneficial in helping with weight management.

Aspartame has been used by consumers around the world for over 30 years in more than 6,000 food and beverage products, ranging from sparkling beverages and chewing gum to gelatins, candies, desserts, yogurts and sugar-free cough drops.

Aspartame is composed of two naturally occurring amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine. Both of these amino acids are found naturally in protein-containing foods. Amino acids are building blocks of protein.

Aspartame contains phenylalanine and should not be consumed by people with a rare genetic disorder called phenylketonuria (PKU). The regulations of most countries require that food and beverage products that contain aspartame carry a statement on the label alerting people with this condition to the presence of phenylalanine.

Aspartame is one of the most thoroughly researched food ingredients in use today.

More than 200 studies support its safety and it is permitted in over 100 countries. Authorities that have approved aspartame include the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), which is an international expert scientific committee that is administered jointly by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO)1. In 2013, The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reconfirmed that aspartame is safe, following the most comprehensive review of aspartame that has ever been undertaken.

FAQs:

Q: What is aspartame?

A: Aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener composed of two amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine. It is 180 to 200 times sweeter than sucrose (table sugar). Aspartame is digested as a protein. It is used in more than 6,000 products around the world.

Q: Is aspartame safe?

A: Yes. Aspartame is one of the most thoroughly researched food ingredients in use today with more than 200 studies supporting its safety. It is permitted for use in over 100 countries.

  • Authorities that have approved aspartame include the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA); the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).
  • In 2013, The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reconfirmed that aspartame is safe, following the most comprehensive review of aspartame that has ever been undertaken.
  • EFSA had previously confirmed the safety of aspartame in 2006, 2009, and 2011.

Q: Can everyone consume aspartame?

A: Aspartame is safe for use by nearly all populations, including children, people with diabetes, and women who are pregnant or lactating. The only exception is that people born with phenylketonuria (PKU) (a rare genetic disorder) cannot metabolize phenylalanine and therefore should avoid aspartame. The regulations of most countries require that food and beverage products that contain aspartame carry a statement on the label alerting people with PKU to the presence of phenylalanine.

Q: Does aspartame cause cancer?

A: No. Numerous studies have been conducted on aspartame confirming its safety. It is one of the most thoroughly researched and studied food ingredients in use today. The results of these studies have demonstrated that aspartame does not cause cancer. (EFSA, 2013, 2009; U.S. FDA, 2007) The authors of a 2013 independent review concluded, "With reference to epidemiologic data, evidence on low-calorie sweeteners – and specifically aspartame – does not support the existence of a consistent association with hematopoietic neoplasms, brain cancer, digestive sites, breast, prostate and several other neoplasms, similarly, low-calorie sweeteners are not related to vascular events and preterm deliveries. (Marinovich et al., 2013)

Q: Is aspartame consumption related to brain tumors in humans?

A: No. There is no association between aspartame consumption and an increase in human brain tumor rates. In 2006, the U.S. National Cancer Institute examined data from over a half million retirees and concluded that "increasing consumption of aspartame-containing beverages was not associated with the development of lymphoma, leukemia, or brain cancer." (U.S. NCI, 2006).

Q: Does aspartame cause Gulf War Syndrome/Illness?

A: No. In a search of more than 21 million citations, there were no studies mentioning aspartame in relation to Gulf War Illness.

Q: In what types of products is aspartame used?

A: Aspartame has been used by consumers around the world for over 30 years in more than 6,000 food and beverage products, ranging from sparkling beverages and chewing gum to gelatins, candies, desserts, yogurts and sugar-free cough drops.

Q: Is there a limit to the amount of aspartame one should consume?

A: Independent scientists of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) have established the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for aspartame. The ADI is an estimate of the amount of a substance that can be ingested daily over a lifetime without appreciable risk to human health. The amount of aspartame used in foods and beverages is far below ADI levels.

Q: What is the ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake) for aspartame?

A: The Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) ADI for aspartame is 40 mg/kg of body weight per day1. Same ADI was retained in the recent EFSA review of 2013. To put this into perspective, an average person weighing 60 kg would need to drink around 18 serving of 300 ml of diet beverage to reach this ADI.